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: well, i'm based in irving, texas, at the university of dallas, where i'm a professor of politics. c-span: is that a full-time job still? >> guest: right. yes. c-span: and when did you--early on in your life, or maybe it wasn't early on--start thinking about things like the constitution or the declaration of independence or the founding fathers? >> guest: well, it took me a while to get there. i was a student in the '60s and '70s of leo strauss and some of strauss' students out in claremont; actually, originally, a student of allan bloom's at cornell, then i went out to claremont. and originally, i was really focused on the study of obscure texts in the history of political philosophy written by dead white males like plato and cicero and people like that. and my first book, in fact, was an interpretation of plato's apology of socrates. but it really wasn't until the '80s that i got interested in a serious way in american politics and i used my knowledge of the history of philosophy to help to understand the principles of this country. and i think it really did help, as a matter of fa
, please, ma'am. >> i'll go quickly. my name is anna, i'm from the dallas/fort worth world affairs council, and as i told everyone yesterday, i teach seniors. i've been facebooking with them, and can they ask me questions, and the point is they want to know for this right now -- because they're online with me -- should they be optimistic? they're very scared, the class of 2013, and what can you say to them that i can pass on to them about economic competitiveness and if they should be optimistic or worried? >> great question from the seniors. okay, steve. >> notwithstanding everything i said before -- [laughter] i'm actually optimistic. i think, i'm optimistic because heidi ticked off a number of these before in a slightly different context, but they're just as applicable in this context. we have the most flexible economy in the world. we have this incredibly diverse labor force, diverse group of people in this country who come here because of the opportunity. there are not that many people who leave america to go live in all these other places that we worry about being more competitive th
, castro, military-industrial complex, what happened in dallas, the assassination of john f. kennedy, sunday at kevin:30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> florida senator marco rubio will be in ireland, he will speak at a fund-raiser, and the first trip to iowa. >> earlier this week retiring massachusetts congressman barney frank talked about sequestration and upcoming fiscal cliff negotiations which he believes will cause a, quote, short-term bumps to the economy. he spoke at an event in the atlantic. it is 20 minutes. >> congressman barney frank in his last term as congressman, too big to fail and author of the deal breaker column in the new york times and cnbc, what is it? scrawled box. i watch it every day. and half of dodd-frank here. >> thank you. thank you for being here. about 100 things to talk about in a short amount of time and a lot of issues related to wall street, given the water cooler conversation seems to be the last 72 hours, general david petraeus and the real housewives of tampa. i figured i would give you the floor to tell us your thoughts. >> having argued to, and to
for a b. in dallas they've tried offering second graders $2 for each book they read. now, some people think this is a promising idea, other people aren't very happy about it. so let's have a discussion here and begin by taking a survey of opinion. if you were the superintendent of one of these school districts and you were approached with this proposal, how many think it's a good idea worth trying, and is how many would object in principle? be let's see, first, those of you who -- how many would object? how many would not like this idea? quite a few. and how many think it's worth trying? all right. we have a pretty good division of opinion. let's begin by those who object. who is willing to explain, to offer your reason? why do you think this would be objectionable in principle in -- principle? anyone? who will start us off? yes, stand up, and we'll get you a microphone. go ahead. >> i would -- >> over here. >> i would object because there's a basic value in learning, there's a basic value in learning, a basic excitement about learning new things. if you start paying for that, you rem
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4

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